Tom Grisso 2016 IAFMHS Keynote Address

iafmhs logocmykDr. Tom Grisso presents keynote address on Juvenile Sentencing and What Forensic Clinicians can Provide at the 2016 International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services.

This content is provided in partnership with the International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services (IAFMHS). Click these links for more information on IAFMHS or to become a member.

 

About Tom Grisso

Thomas Grisso, Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus in Psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. In addition to engaging in research and teaching in the University’s Law and Psychiatry Program, he consults to federal and state programs on policy and forensic practice in the juvenile justice system. His work has focused on improving forensic evaluations for the courts and informing policy and law for youths in the juvenile justice system and for persons with mental disorders. Several of his fifteen books have been influential in setting standards for forensic mental health evaluations. He pioneered concepts on which forensic evaluations of several legal competencies have been developed, especially competence to stand trial and (with Paul Appelbaum) competence to consent to treatment. His contributions to juvenile justice policy and practice have included his studies of juveniles’ capacities to waive Miranda rights and their competence to stand trial, as well as development (with Richard Barnum) of a mental health screening tool now used statewide in juvenile detention and corrections in over 40 states. Research performed with his colleagues in the MacArthur Foundation’s Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice was relied upon by the U.S. Supreme Court in its recent decisions against the death penalty and limiting the sentence of life without parole for crimes committed during adolescence. His work has been recognized with awards from the American Psychological Association, the American Psychiatric Association, the Royal College of Psychiatrists (U.K.), the American Psychology-Law Society, an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and the Chancellor’s Medal for Distinguished Scholarship at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Keynote Address at the American Psychology-Law Society meeting presented by Dr. Itiel Dror (video)

Dr. Itiel Dror presents the Keynote Address at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychology-Law Society (AP-LS) in San Diego, March 2015. Dr. Dror’s keynote address speaks about the “Psychology and Impartiality of Forensic Expert Decision Making: When Justice is Not Blind.” For more information about Dr. Dror’s work, please visit: www.cci-hq.com.

About Dr. Dror

Dr. Dror’s academic work relates to theoretical issues underlying human performance and cognition. His research examines the information processing involved in perception, judgment and decision-making. Dr. Itiel Dror has published dozens of peer-reviewed scientific articles and serves as Associate Editor and on the Editorial Boards of several scientific journals.

Dr. Itiel Dror’s specialty is in taking the most theoretical scientific understanding of the human mind, brain and cognition, and translating it into practical and tangible ways to improve human performance in real world domains. This applied research has primarily focused on enhanced cognition through training, decision-making, and use of technology. For example, Dr Dror has advised how to use technology (e.g., interactive videos, web design, gaming) to make training more effective, helped organizations understand the cognitive aptitudes and skills needed for specific task performance (and designed tools useful to predict job performance and for selection & screening), developed ways to minimize expert examiners’ vulnerability to confirmation and other cognitive biases, and conducted research and training on how to best utilize technology in the workplace.

The applied research has taken place in a variety of countries and has included governmental bodies (such as the UK Passport and Identity Services, Department of Health; the US Air Force; and Police Forces in the UK, the US, the Netherlands and Australia) and commercial companies (such as Orange, Deutsche Bank, PWC, and IBM), as well as providing expert reports and testimonies in court cases (such as in the Levi Bellfield case in the Central Criminal Court at the Old Bailey in London).

American Psychology-Law Society Keynote Address

Dr. Patricia Zapf presents her Presidential Address at the American Psychology-Law Society meeting (video)

Dr. Patricia Zapf, President of the American Psychology-Law Society, presents her address at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychology-Law Society in San Diego (March, 2015). In her address, Dr. Zapf speaks about the importance of dissemination of our work to expand our field and to reach a wider audience.

About Dr. Zapf

Dr. Patricia A. Zapf obtained her PhD in Clinical Forensic psychology from Simon Fraser University in Canada and currently holds the position of Professor in the Department of Psychology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, The City University of New York. She is the Editor of the American Psychology-Law Society book series; Associate Editor of Law and Human Behavior; and is on the Editorial Boards of 5 journals in psychology and law. Dr. Zapf is on the Board of Directors for the International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services and currently serves as President for the American Psychology-Law Society (AP-LS; Division 41, APA). She has published 8 books and manuals and over 85 articles and chapters, mainly on the assessment and conceptualization of criminal competencies. Dr. Zapf was appointed Fellow of the American Psychological Association and Distinguished Member of the American Psychology-Law Society in 2006 for outstanding contributions to the field of law and psychology for her work in competency evaluation. In addition to her research, she serves as consultant to various criminal justice and policy organizations and has a private practice in forensic assessment. She has conducted over 2500 forensic evaluations in both the United States and Canada and has served as an expert witness in a number of cases, including the competency hearing of Jose Padilla. Dr. Zapf is the author of Best Practices in Forensic Mental Health Assessment: Evaluation of Competency to Stand Trial; editor of Forensic Assessments in Criminal and Civil Law: A Handbook for Lawyers; and Editor-in-Chief of the APA Handbook of Forensic Psychology. She served on National Judicial College’s Mental Competency—Best Practices Model panel of experts and travels throughout the United States and Internationally to train legal and mental health professionals on best practices in forensic evaluation.

American Psychology-Law Society Presidential Address

Distinguished Contributions Award Winner Dr. Frederick on Multiple Measures of Malingering (Video)

Dr. Richard Frederick, winner of the American Academy of Forensic Psychology’s Distinguished Contributions Award, presented his address at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychology-Law Society in San Diego (March, 2015). Dr. Frederick’s award address is entitled, “Too Much Information: Problems when using Multiple Malingering Tests.” In this address, Dr. Frederick discusses the issues involved in using multiple measures of malingering. The Excel spreadsheet to which he refers in his address (a very helpful resource!) can be downloaded here. In addition, a copy of his slides can be downloaded here.

About Dr. Frederick

Richard Frederick, Ph.D., is a forensic psychologist in Springfield, Missouri, where he is in private practice. He graduated from Oklahoma State University with a doctorate in clinical psychology in 1986. He completed his internship at Naval Hospital Bethesda, Maryland. He completed a post-doctoral fellowship in forensic psychology at the Whiting Forensic Institute in Middletown, Connecticut. He retired from the U.S. Navy as a Captain in 2008, with four tours of duty in support of Operations Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom. He retired from the Department of Justice, U.S. Medical Center for Federal Prisoners, in 2012. Dr. Frederick is board certified in forensic psychology (American Board of Professional Psychology). He is past president of and National Chair of Examinations for the American Board of Forensic Psychology (2006-2011). Since 2008, he is co-chair of continuing education for the American Academy of Forensic Psychology. He serves on APA’s Committee for Psychological Testing and Assessment (2011-2013). Dr. Frederick is author of the Validity Indicator Profile, a forensic assessment instrument in worldwide distribution.

More information about Dr. Frederick’s work can be found on his website.

http://richardfrederick.com/

AAFP Distinguished Contributions Award Address

The supplement materials are available here.

The presentation slides are available here.

How Not to Become Your Worst (Professional) Nightmare: Self Care, Goal Setting, and the Importance of Continued Professional Development (Video)

Patricia ZapfThis September I had the great opportunity to kick off the American Psychology-Law Society (AP-LS; Division 41 of the American Psychological Association) Student Committee’s webinar series. In this series, the Student Committee asks different leaders in the field of psychology and law to present on topics that are of interest and importance to students in the field. As the current President of AP-LS I was thrilled to be asked to kick off this year’s series and decided to speak about an issue near and dear to my heart and my professional vision–the importance of self care, goal setting, and continued professional development.

If you have spent any time with me professionally you know that I have taken on two missions in recent years:

Mission #1

First, to further our efforts in translating the work that we do in this field to the various audiences that can benefit from this work…practitioners, researchers, clinicians, members of the public, policy makers, legal professionals, graduate students, high school students, etc. There are many groups of people who can benefit from having high quality information about issues relevant to the field of psychology and law and so it has become a mission of mine to attempt to improve our efforts at both translating and disseminating the work that we do in this field to those that can use it.

Mission #2

Second, to promote the importance of continued professional development. As graduate students we have our continued professional development activities planned for us and, although we are instilled with the importance of lifelong learning throughout our graduate studies, it takes a concerted effort on our part to actually plan for our own continued professional development after we graduate. Too often professionals attend Continuing Education workshops or lectures simply because most of us are mandated by our licensing boards to complete a requisite number of CE credits each year to maintain our licensure. While some of these CE opportunities are directly in line with our own professional goals, many times they are simply selected because they are convenient, work with our schedule, or offered close to home. It seems to me that a better strategy would be for each of us to take some time each year to reflect on our current knowledge, skill set, and level of expertise and then to plan continued professional development activities that will help us improve any areas of deficit or build areas of strength…with the ultimate goal of moving us closer to our own professional goals.

Webinar

In this webinar, I get a chance to talk a bit more about how we can work towards our own continued professional development by setting goals, reflecting on our own strengths and weaknesses, and taking care of ourselves. Since giving this webinar I have had emails and calls from students asking how they can further their own professional goals and take care of themselves at the same time…the answer is always the same…reflect on where you are, where you want to go, set goals (both personal & professional; both short-term and longer-term), and then schedule accordingly. Time management is the key to success…if it’s not scheduled on your calendar, it’s not real. When your schedule starts to become overwhelming, look back at your goals and let them guide you towards what you need to say no to and what you should keep on your calendar. Each of us have 24 hours in our day and some of us (think President Obama, Oprah, Bill Gates, or whoever you see as extremely successful) do a lot with that time…the key is time management (saying yes to those things that will further your own goals and politely declining those things that will serve as detours or deterrents to meeting your goals).

Special thanks to Casey LaDuke and Meghann Galloway for organizing the AP-LS Student Committee webinar series!

Innovating Psychology and Law: AP-LS Presidential Address by Dr. Jennifer Skeem (Video)

Skeem1This year at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychology-Law Society (AP-LS), which took place in New Orleans during the first weekend in March, Dr. Jennifer Skeem presented her Presidential Address to a packed room early Friday morning.

Innovating Psychology and Law

The theme for Dr. Skeem’s address was innovating psychology and law, a topic in which Skeem has been thinking about for a while and addressing in her scholarship. Skeem’s chosen topic has also been addressed, either directly or indirectly, by other AP-LS Presidents in their Presidential Addresses and is one that is sure to continue to be addressed in the future as our field moves forward in important ways. The need to be constantly evolving and innovating is a common theme across many areas of science and Skeem’s message of the importance of interdisciplinary work for the advancement of our field cannot be overestimated. In her Address, Dr. Skeem sets out three ways in which we can innovate the field of psychology and law to achieve broader relevance across multiple domains. Dr. Skeem’s Presidential Address is a must-watch for anyone interested in how we can begin to move our field forward and outward in different ways.

For more information about the American Psychology-Law Society (Division 41 of the American Psychological Association), please visit the AP-LS website at: www.ap-ls.org

A Clinical Case Study using the HCR-20 Version 3 (Video)

hcr-20 v3The HCR-20 is the most commonly used violence risk assessment instrument across 44 countries, with over 100 evaluation studies in 32 countries. Version 3 of the HCR-20 was released in 2013 and since that time professionals and organizations have begun the process of implementing Version 3 into their clinical practice and clinical service provision.

Administration and Development of the HCR-V3

Drs. Kevin Douglas and Stephen Hart (authors of the HCR-V3) have been training individuals and organizations on the development of the HCR-V3 as well as the Administration, Scoring, and Interpretation of this instrument and the structured professional judgment approach to threat assessment and risk management. Free videos providing an overview of these issues are available here.

Clinical Implementation Issues

At the International launch of the HCR-V3 in Edinburgh, Scotland in April 2013 Dr. Henrik Belfrage (also an author of the HCR-V3) spoke about the successful clinical implementation of the HCR-V3. This video is available here.

Case Study

Also at the International launch for the HCR-V3, Dr. Caroline Logan discussed a case study wherein she completed a risk assessment using the HCR-23 and spoke about the importance of using the HCR-V3 to structure the formulation of any case. In this video, she provides clinical examples and a description of the process of case formulation and consideration of relevant risk factors.

Professional Training on the HCR-V3

CONCEPT is pleased to offer a video-on-demand professional training program on the development, administration, scoring, interpretation, and clinical implementation of the HCR-V3. The training program takes approximately 20 hours to complete. Professionals are taken through the development of Version 3 and the rationale for revision and update of this instrument. The training program describes why and how the HCR-20 was revised, how Version 3 differs from its predecessors, initial research validation of the HCR-V3, what its risk factors are and how to rate them, how to formulate a case and engage in risk management planning using the HCR-V3. The program includes both didactic and interactive components and allows the opportunity to apply the HCR-V3 to a clinical case.  More information on this professional training program is available here.

Dr. Stephen Hart on the Administration of the HCR-V3 (Video)

prof-stephen-hartIn 2013 the long-awaited Version 3 of the HCR-20 was published. This assessment instrument uses a Structured Professional Judgment approach to threat assessment and risk management. At the International launch of the HCR-V3 in Edinburgh, Scotland a one-day conference was held where international experts involved in the development of Version 3 presented on various topics related to threat assessment and risk management with the new HCR-20 Version 3 (HCR-V3).

One of the speakers at this day-long conference, Dr. Stephen Hart, is an internationally known expert on threat assessment and risk management who helped shape the evolution of the structured professional judgment approach to risk assessment.

Administration of the HCR-V3

In this video, Dr. Hart presents on the administration procedures for the HCR-V3. This video is a must-watch for anyone involved in threat assessment and risk management.

Professional Training on the HCR-V3

CONCEPT has developed video-based online professional training on the HCR-V3. Drs. Kevin Douglas (the first author of the HCR-V3) and Stephen Hart presented a 2-day workshop on the HCR-V3 at Fordham University in NYC in June 2013. The online professional training program includes both didactic and interactive components and allows the opportunity to apply the HCR-V3 to sample cases. All of the training content provided in the 2-day in-person workshop is included in this training program and additional case studies, along with the opportunity to work through sample cases, is also included. More information about this professional training program is available here.

Dr. Stephen Hart on the SPJ Approach to Risk Assessment (Video)

hcr_20The Structured Professional Judgment (SPJ) approach to risk assessment holds many points of differentiation from the actuarial approach. Whereas the actuarial approach uses actuarial tests that are developed in one setting and may not be predictive in other settings, the SPJ approach uses instruments that have been developed on the basis of empirical research that identifies the most relevant risk factors to consider in a given context. Evaluators using the SPJ approach are guided in their case formulation by empirical evidence and a strong literature and research base. Several instruments using an SPJ approach have been developed for various aspects of threat assessment and risk management. Dr. Stephen Hart is a leading authority figure, researcher, and clinical scientist who has shaped the evolution of the SPJ approach to violence risk assessment.

The Evolution of the Structured Professional Judgement Approach to Violence Risk Assessment

At the International launch for Version 3 of the HCR-20 in Edinburgh, Scotland in April 2013 internationally known researchers and clinicians presented a one-day conference on Structured Professional Judgment and the HCR-20 Version 3. In this video, Professor Stephen Hart speaks about the evolution of the Structured Professional Judgement (SPJ) approach to violence risk assessment. He presents the interesting history of this approach and the differentiation between the SPJ approach and the actuarial approach to violence risk assessment. In this video, Dr. Hart uses the example of taking the pilot out of the cockpit to describe the differences between the SPJ and actuarial approaches. It is a must-watch for anyone who is involved in risk assessment or threat management.

Professional Training in the SPJ Approach to Threat Assessment and Risk Management

Dr. Hart and his colleagues, Drs. Kelly Watt, Kevin Douglas, and Randall Kropp, have presented professional training workshops on threat assessment and risk management using an SPJ approach around the world. A number of these workshops have been developed into online professional training programs, providing both didactic as well as interactive training activities in an online format. More information on the professional training programs available on this topic can be found here. We continue to develop more professional training programs an resources in this important area of the field.

Development of the HCR-20 Version 3 (Videos of Dr. Kevin Douglas)

HCR20V3The HCR-20 is a structured professional judgment risk assessment tool that is used throughout the world to assist in the evaluation of risk for general violence. In 2013, the third version of this risk assessment instrument was published. As part of the launch of the long-awaited 3rd edition to this risk assessment tool, a series of events was held in various countries around the world. The launch event in the United States took place in June at Fordham University in New York City. In NYC, Drs. Kevin Douglas and Stephen Hart presented a 2-day workshop on Version 3 to a full house of mental health and legal professionals. The International launch took place two months earlier, in April in Edinburgh, Scotland at The Royal Society of Edinburgh. In Edinburgh, the international launch began with a one-day conference on Version 3 of the HCR-20 V3 followed by four days of workshops on various aspects of threat assessment and risk management.

The Edinburgh Conference on Version 3 of the HCR-20

At the one-day conference that kicked-off the international launch of the HCR-20 Version 3 (HCR-V3) hundreds of professionals from around Europe gathered to hear a distinguished panel of experts present lectures on the revision process for the HCR-20 as well as lectures on structured professional judgment, administration and scoring of the HCR-V3, case studies using the HCR-V3, and how best to implement the HCR-V3 into clinical practice. CONCEPT was on hand to capture this excellent content by all speakers.

Dr. Kevin Douglas on the Revision Process for the HCR-V3

In this video, Dr. Douglas describes the process for development of the HCR-V3. He describes the detailed process of obtaining feedback and test users throughout the world.

Addressing the Limitation and Weaknesses of the HCR-20 in the HCR-V3

In this video, Dr. Douglas describes the limitations and weaknesses of the HCR-20 and how these were remedied in the third version of this instrument.

Professional Training on the HCR-V3

CONCEPT has developed a video-based training program on the HCR-V3 from the workshop presented by Drs. Douglas and Hart at Fordham University in June 2013. This training program includes both didactic and interactive components and allows the opportunity to apply the HCR-V3 to sample cases. All of the training content provided in the 2-day in-person workshop is included in this training program and additional case studies, along with the opportunity to work through sample cases, is also included. More information about this professional training program is available here.