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AP-LS Conference 2015

 AP-LS Conference 2015

AP-LAWSOCIETY-ANNUALMEETING
CLICK HERE FOR THE PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The American Psychology-Law Society Annual Meeting will be March 19-21 in San Diego, California at the Westin Gaslamp Quarter.

The meeting provides an invigorating glimpse of new developments in research, law and policy across a broad array of topics such as: forensic assessment, children and the law, jury decision-making, victims and trauma. Students and young professionals can network with those who have made distinguished contributions; practitioners can keep abreast of the latest clinical and legal advances; and all can enjoy a conference and social program they can tailor to their interests.For more information, visit the AP-LS Annual Conference page.  We hope to see you there!

Opening Keynote Address

Goldstein_Head ShotTraumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Recent Research Advances and Implications for Forensic Psychology

Lee E. Goldstein, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology, Ophthalmology, Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, Biomedical Engineering, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Boston University School of Medicine, College of Engineering & Photonics Center, Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Boston, MA 02118 USA.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a signature injury of the recent military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and a leading cause of death and long-term disability in civilians (1-4). Concussive and subconcussive TBI are often accompanied by acute cognitive impairment, and in some cases, chronic neuropsychiatric sequelae. Amongst the most serious is chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a progressive and ultimately fatal tau protein neurodegenerative disease (5). The first part of the presentation will highlight the neuropathology of CTE in repetitively head-injured athletes and blast-exposed combat veterans (6). The second part of the presentation will highlight recent laboratory research that uses state-of-the-art experimental techniques to uncover the mechanisms that link head injury to acute TBI and chronic sequelae, including CTE. We have shown that laboratory mice exposed to experimental blast also develop CTE neuropathology—including tau proteinopathy, myelinated axonopathy, focal microvasculopathy, chronic neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration—that strikingly recapitulates core features of CTE in humans. Structuctural abnormalities in the brains of blast-exposed mice are accompanied by neurophysiological deficits—including slowed axonal conduction and defective long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic plasticity—that correlate with learning impairments, memory deficits, executive dysfunction. Significantly, blast-related brain pathology and functional deficits emerged within two weeks and persisted for at least one month after exposure to a single blast. Detailed analysis of intracerebral pressure dynamics and head kinematics during blast exposure showed that blast neurotrauma is not mediated by blast wave transit through the brain or thoracovascular mechanisms (“waterhammer effect”) as previously thought. Rather, blast TBI (“shell shock”) results from blast wind that exerts oscillating inertial forces on the head and injurious shear strain in the brain (“bobblehead effect”). The net result damages fragile nerve cell axons and small blood vessels in the brain. Over time, these injuries lead to a distinctive pattern of CTE pathology and functional deficits. Recently, we developed a biofidelic mouse model of concussive head injury that accurately mimics acute and chronic effects of sports-related TBI in humans. Comparison of results in the two TBI models has led to important mechanistic insights into how head injury leads to acute and chronic effects of neurotrauma. This presentation will provide an overview of recent research advances in understanding head trauma, acute concussion, post-concussion syndromes, and chronic sequelae. TBI and CTE pathophysiology will be presented in the context of brain dysfunction and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Implications for forensic psychology will be highlighted throughout the presentation.

References: [1] Hoge CW, et al., N Engl J Med 358, 453 (2008). [2] Tanielian TL, Jaycox LH, “Invisible wounds of war” RAND, Santa Monica, CA (2008). [3] Faul M, et al., Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA (2010). [4] Roozenbeek B, et al., Nat Rev Neurol 9, 231 (2013). [5] McKee AC, et al., Brain 136, 43 (2013). [6] Goldstein LE, et al., Science Transl Med 4, 134ra60 (2012).

 

spring-training-logo2Looking for training in Forensic Evaluation? Check out the upcoming spring training sessions!

Session 1: Evaluation of Risk for Violence using the HCR-20-V3

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Instructors: Dr. Kevin Douglas & Dr. Stephen Hart

Please join us our Spring Training Session on the Evaluation of Risk for Violence using the HCR-20-V3 presented by Dr. Kevin Douglas and Dr. Stephen Hart. We limit the number of participants in each Spring Training session to ensure that you have the opportunity to engage in meaningful interaction with Drs. Douglas and Hart and to discuss your current clinical cases in a small-group format. This 30-hour training session includes 20 hours of online training and 10 hours of consultation time with the instructors over the course of 10 weeks, beginning March 1, 2015. Participants should expect to devote approximately 3 hours each week to this training program.

Session 2: Best Practices in the Evaluation of Competence to Stand Trial

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Instructor: Dr. Patricia Zapf

Please join us our Spring Training Session on Best Practices in the Evaluation of Competence to Stand Trial presented by Dr. Patricia Zapf. We limit the number of participants in each Spring Training session to ensure that you have the opportunity to engage in meaningful interaction with Dr. Zapf and to discuss your current clinical cases in a small-group format. This 30-hour training session includes 20 hours of online training and 10 hours of consultation time with Dr. Zapf over the course of 10 weeks, beginning March 1, 2015. Participants should expect to devote approximately 3 hours each week to this training program.


Interested in learning more about our Spring Training?

 
 

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